Overview

  • Title: Global HR Forum 2013
  • Theme: Beyond Walls
  • Date: November 6(Wed) - 7(Thu), 2013
  • Venue: Sheraton Grande Walkerhill, Seoul, Korea

Program

  • November 6(Wed)
  • November 7(Thu)
Time Program
07:00-08:30 Registration
Opening Ceremony & Keynote Speech
08:30-09:00

Opening Ceremony

Opening Speech
Kiwoong Kim President and Publisher, The Korea Economic Daily
Welcoming Speech
Namsoo Seo Minister, Korean Ministry of Education
Congratulatory Speech
Hong-won Jung Prime Minister, Republic of Korea
09:00-10:00

Keynote Speech

How Israel Developed its Human Talents through the Creative ProcessDetail

Speaker
Ehud Barak Former Prime Minister of Israel
Interlocutor
Il Sakong Chairman & CEO, Institute for Global Economics
Plenary Session & Special Session
10:10-12:00

Plenary Session I

Lecture on Successful Leadership by Global CEOsDetail

Moderator
Sungchull Junn Chairman, Institute of Global Management
Speaker
Hans Paul Buerkner Chairman, The Boston Consulting Group
Speaker
Laszlo Bock Senior Vice President of People Operations, Google
Speaker
Larry Emond Managing Partner, Gallup

Special Session I

"Speaking of the Future" by Francis FukuyamaDetail

Speaker
Francis Fukuyama Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford Univ.
Interlocutor
Joohyun Kim President & CEO, Hyundai Research Institute
12:00-13:00 Luncheon
13:00-14:20

Plenary Session II

Balanced Regional Development Driven by Creative EconomyDetail

Moderator
Geosuk Suh President, Korean Council for Univ. Education
Speaker
Pete Downes Principal & Vice Chancellor, Univ. of Dundee
Speaker
Tatsuo Suganuma President, Miyazaki Univ.
Speaker
Li Qingquan President, Shenzhen Univ.
Discussant
Yongmin Kim President, POSTECH

Special Session II

OECD Skills Strategy and Challenges for Korea in an International Perspective Detail

Moderator
Bonggun Chung Visiting Professor, Graduate School of International Studies, Seoul National Univ.
Speaker
Deborah Roseveare Head, OECD Skill Beyond School
Speaker
Miho Taguma Senior Policy Analyst, Directorate for Education and Skills, OECD
Discussant
Youngsup Choi Senior Research Fellow, Korea Research Institute for Vocational Education & Training(KRIVET)
Discussant
Sanghoon Bae Professor of Education, Sungkyunkwan Univ.
14:20-14:50 Coffee Break
14:50-16:10

Plenary Session III

New Roles of Universities in Creative Economy as a Center for Knowledge Creation & Integration
Detail

Moderator
Byoungyoon Kim Vice President of Research, KAIST
Speaker
Pradeep Khosla Chancellor, Univ. of California-San Diego
Speaker
Regis Kelly Director, California Institute for Quantitative Bioscience(QB3)
Speaker
Gerhard Schmitt Senior Vice President, ETH Global

Special Session III

A Dynamic Mapping of the UK's Creative Industries: The Convergence of Art & Science (Part I)
Detail

Moderator
Martin Fryer Director, British Council Korea
Panelist
John Hughes Vice Chancellor, Bangor Univ.
Panelist
Pete Downes Principal & Vice Chancellor, Univ. of Dundee
Panelist
Thomas Inns Principal, The Glasgow School of Art
Panelist
Patrick Loughrey Warden, Goldsmiths, Univ. of London
Panelist
Mark Smith Vice Chancellor, Lancaster Univ.
Panelist
Paul Thompson Rector, Royal College of Art
Panelist
Nigel Carrington Vice Chancellor, Univ. of the Arts London
16:10-16:40 Break
16:40-18:00

Plenary Session IV

The Secret of Vocational Education and Training in Germany, Switzerland & Singapore: How Did They Achieve World’s Lowest Youth Unemployment Rate?Detail

Moderator
Youngbum Park President, Korea Research Institute for Vocational Education & Training(KRIVET)
Speaker
Christian Lettmayr Acting Director, European Center for the Development of Vocational Training(CEDEFOP)
Speaker
Ursula Renold Head of Research Division Comparative Education Systems, ETH Zurich, Swiss Economic Institute
Speaker
Chan Lee Mun Principal & CEO, Nanyang Polytechnic

Special Session IV

A Dynamic Mapping of the UK's Creative Industries: The Convergence of Art & Science (Part II)
Detail

Moderator
Martin Fryer Director, British Council Korea
Panelist
John Hughes  Vice Chancellor, Bangor Univ.
Panelist
Pete Downes  Principal & Vice Chancellor, Univ. of Dundee 
Panelist
Thomas Inns  Principal, The Glasgow School of Art 
Panelist
Patrick Loughrey  Warden, Goldsmiths, Univ. of London
Panelist
Mark Smith  Vice Chancellor, Lancaster Univ.
Panelist
Paul Thompson  Rector, Royal College of Art 
Panelist
Nigel Carrington  Vice Chancellor, Univ. of the Arts London
Time Program
07:30~09:00 Registration
09:00~10:30

Track A Session 1

Track A

Skills Dynamics for Happy Education and Social ProgressDetail

Moderator
Byongsun Kwak Chairperson, Korea Student Aid Foundation
Speaker
Katarzyna Kubacka Analyst, OECD
Speaker
Cary Roseth Associate Professor, Michigan State Univ.
Discussant
Meesook Kim Director, Office of Global Education Research, Korean Educational Development Institute
Discussant
Euijoon Yoon Managing Director, Core Industry Sector, Office of Strategic R&D Planning, Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy

Track B Session 1

Track B

How to Recruit & Train the Best Employees in Job MarketDetail

Moderator
Insik Roh President, Samsung Economic Research Institute
Speaker
Julie Gebauer Managing Director of Talent & Rewards, Towers Watson
Speaker
Reginald Bull Executive Vice President of Global HR, Doosan Holdings
Discussant
Kwanghwi Kim Vice President & Head of HR / Cluster ASP HR Business Partner, Siemens Ltd. Seoul
Discussant
Sanghyo Kim Executive Vice President, KT

Track C Session 1

Track C

Building Basics for Skill-oriented Society - National Competence Standards(NCS) & National Qualification Framework(NQF)Detail

Moderator
Youngjung Song President, Human Resources Development Service of Korea
Speaker
Simpson Poon Vice President, Technological and Higher Education Institute of Hong Kong
Speaker
Melissa McEwen General Manager, Skills Connect and Asian Connections Branch, Department of Industry, Australian Government
Discussant
Jeongyoon Cho Senior Research Fellow, Korea Research Institute for Vocational Education & Training(KRIVET)
Discussant
Slava Pevec Grm Senior Expert, European Center for the Development of Vocational Training(CEDEFOP)

Track D Session 1

Track D

Developing Leaders of Character at West PointDetail

Interlocutor
Sunny Yi Managing Partner, Bain & Company, Inc.
Speaker
Timothy Trainor Brigadier General & Dean of the Academic Board, United States Military Academy, West Point. US Army
10:30-11:00 Coffee Break
11:00-12:30

Track A Session 2

Track A

Schools Nurturing Dreams and Aspirations Detail

Moderator
Peck Cho Distinguished Professor, Dongguk Univ.
Speaker
Brian Newberry Associate Professor at the Department of Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education, California State Univ. San Bernardino
Speaker
Gyuho Hwang Professor of Education, Ewha Womans Univ.
Discussant
Bongwhan Kim Professor of Education, Sookmyung Women‘s Univ.
Discussant
Kioh Jeong Professor, Graduate School of Education Policy, Korea National Univ. of Education

Track B Session 2

Track B

Breaking through the Wall of Conformity at Workplaces Detail

Moderator
Heesung Lee Country Manager, Intel Korea
Speaker
Scott Drach Vice President of Human Resources, Boeing Defense, Space & Security
Speaker
Eric Alexander Vice President of Business Development, Flipboard
Discussant
Heekyung Jo Min EVP & Global CSV, CJ Corp.
Discussant
Wonho Lee Executive Vice President, Shinhan Bank

Track C Session 2

Track C

Education Welfare System for Multicultural Talents Detail

Moderator
Sangmee Bak Professor, Division of International Studies, Hankuk Univ. of Foreign Studies
Speaker
Randall Hansen Director, Centre for European Russian and Eurasian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs, Univ. of Toronto
Speaker
Kyemin Yang Research Fellow, National Youth Policy Institute
Discussant
Ohhyun Kwon Director, Center for Multicultural Education, Seoul National Univ.
Discussant
Namchul Lee Director General, Korea Research Institute for Vocational Education & Training(KRIVET)

Track D Session 2

Track D

Gifted Youth Education: Now and the Future Detail

Interlocutor
Kyungchan Min Professor of Mathematics, College of Science, Yonsei Univ.
Speaker
Richard Sinclair Dean, Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science, UNT
Speaker
Hang Kim Hoo Principal, National Univ. of Singapore(NUS) High School of Mathematics and Science
12:30-14:00 Luncheon
14:00-15:30

Track A Session 3

Track A

Key Competencies for Future Leaders: Social Communication and Collaboration Detail

Moderator
Haedeok Song Professor of Education, Chung-Ang Univ.
Speaker
Jay Rojewski Professor, Univ. of Georgia
Speaker
Michael Grund Managing Director, Merck Ltd. Korea
Discussant
Hwanyoung Jang Assistant Professor of Education, Dongguk Univ.
Discussant
Joongsoon Lee Principal, Busan National Mechanical Technical High School

Track B Session 3

Track B

Talented Young Entrepreneurs & Youth Start-ups in Creative Economy Detail

Moderator
Byungdo Kim Dean, Seoul National Univ. Business School
Speaker
Regis Kelly Director, California Institute for Quantitative Bioscience(QB3)
Speaker
Heuijae Pahk President & CEO, SNU Precision
Speaker
Hyejin Ryu KAIST IPCEO
Discussant
Wonjae Lee CEO, YOZMA Group

Track C Session 3

Track C

Roles and Responsibility of Higher Vocational Education Detail

Moderator
Giwoo Lee Chairman, Korean Council for Univ. College Education
Speaker
Clifford Adelman Senior Associate, Institute for Higher Education Policy
Speaker
Christian Lettmayr Acting Director, European Center for the Development of Vocational Training(CEDEFOP)
Discussant
Kiwon Jang President, Kookje College
Discussant
Jiyong Chun President, Kyungbok Univ.

Track D Session 3

Track D

Beyond the Classroom Walls to Communicate with the World Detail

Moderator
Jinsook Kim Director, Smart Education R&D Division, Korea Education and Research Information Service(KERIS)
Speaker
Bruce Dixon Co-Founder & President, Anywhere Anytime Learning Foundation(AALF)
Speaker
Eunhee Jung Founder & Chairperson, IVECA International Virtual Schooling
Discussant
Jaeho Lee Professor, Department of Computer Education, Gyeongin National Univ. of Education
Discussant
Eunsoon Baik Executive Director, National Institute for Lifelong Education(NILE)
15:30-16:00 Coffee Break
16:00-17:30

Track A Session 4

Track A

Lifelong Learning in the Centennial Era - For the Happy Third Age Detail

Moderator
Unshil Choi President, National Institute for Lifelong Education (NILE)
Speaker
Michael Osborne Professor of Adult and Lifelong Learning, Univ. of Glasgow
Speaker
Ian Baptiste Professor, Humanities and Social Sciences, St. George's Univ.
Discussant
Heesu Lee Dean, Graduate School of Global HR Development, Chung-Ang Univ.
Discussant
Zunsang Han Professor, College of Sciences in Education, Yonsei Univ.

Track B Session 4

Track B

How Global Companies Recruit C-level Executives Detail

Moderator
Youngkey Hwang Senior Advisor, Shin & Kim
Speaker
Tom Pedersen Managing Director, Leadership and Talent Consulting, Korn Ferry International
Speaker
Christopher Sungwook Khang President & CEO, GE Korea
Speaker
Kweontaek Chung SVP, Director of HR & Organization Research Department, Samsung Economic Research Institute

Track C Session 4

Track C

Graduating in a Competitive Job Market: Which is the Most Required Skill or Quality? Detail

Moderator
Jongkoo Park Chairman & CEO, Korea Polytechnics
Panelist
Alessandro Colombo  Director of Institutional Relations & Communication, Eupolis Lombardia Institute for Research, Statistics, and Training
Panelist
Seongchul Lee  Chief Learning Officer, Hyundai Motor Group Univ.
Panelist
Peck Cho  Distinguished Professor, Dongguk Univ.
Panelist
Junseok Lee  CEO, Classe Studio
Panelist
Jingu Jang  President, Yonsei Management Consulting Group(YMCG),  A Business Club of Yonsei Univ.

Track D Session 4

Track D

How Social Media Changes HR Detail

Interlocutor
Margaret Key Market Leader, Burson-Marsteller Korea
Speaker
Madan Nagaldinne Head of HR, Asia-Pacific, Facebook
17:30-18:00

Wrap-Up

Youngbum Park President, Korea Research Institute for Vocational Education & Training(KRIVET)

Keynote Speech

How Israel Developed its Human Talents through the Creative Process

Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak will speak about how Israel has become a global high-tech hub and one of the world's strongest countries through the power of creative human talents.

Plenary Session 1

Lecture on Successful Leadership by Global CEOs

Due to accelerated globalization and intensified competition within the global market, multinational companies need talented leaders who can successfully manage regionalization and internationalization, centralization and de-concentration of their business simultaneously in order to become winners. In addition, further development of distinguished strategies and prosperity on using their collective knowledge, skills and human capitals are required for those transnational companies. In this session, CEOs from the prestigious global companies will speak about their experiences in successful business practices, and share ideas on possible challenges in creative economy and strategies to improve international competitiveness.

Special Session 1

“Speaking of Future” by Francis Fukuyama

Francis Fukuyama is one of the most influential social & political philosophers of our time. Since publishing his global bestseller The End of History and the Last Man in 1992, Fukuyama has cemented himself as a hugely influential thinker, and has continued writing thoughtful books and sharing fresh insights with his readers worldwide. Especially in his newest book, The Origins of Political Order, he covered interesting topics such as history and nature of politics and the origins of democratic societies, showing his broad and in-depth knowledge on history, archaeology, socio-biology, economics and political science. In this session, Dr. Fukuyama will share his thoughts and perspectives on the future of Northeast Asia and the World.

Plenary Session 2

Balanced Regional Development Driven by Creative Economy

As the number of school-aged children has dropped rapidly, universities in non-metropolitan areas are now experiencing difficulties attracting students. Moreover, imbalanced regional development generates a vicious cycle of brain drain and low growth of regional economy, as a large number of high school and college graduates move to metropolitan areas for better schools and job opportunities. By cooperating with local businesses and industries, regional universities can lead the economic regeneration of local communities. This session will hold discussions on the most challenging problematic and the roles of the regional universities in attracting and educating talented young people, and present how it can contribute to successful creative economy after all.

Special Session 2

OECD Skills Strategy and Challenges for Korea in an International Perspective

The new Korean government is proposing a national agenda for “creative economy”, which aims sustainable economic development based on the convergence of science, culture and industry. In order to achieve the successful creative economy, it is required to reform the existing skills development & utilization system, and draw more active participation from skilled individuals in the current labor market. During this session, OECD specialists will speak about the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies(PIAAC) and the result of comparative analysis on the human resources capability of the adults in Korea and other countries. The session will cover the main findings of OECD review on skills system in Korea that will the achievements, strengths, drawbacks and shortcoming of Korean skills system, and also hold discussions regarding the effective skills strategy and policies for building creative economy.

Plenary Session 3

New Roles of Universities in Creative Economy as a Center for Knowledge Creation & Integration

In a knowledge-based society, creative talents are decisive in achieving the competitiveness of one country. Accordingly, the importance of higher education which cultivates creative and multidisciplinary talents who can enhance national competitiveness is growing more and more. In these days, many universities in Korea have faced challenges, such as a decrease in number of high school graduates, globalization of higher education and transference from industrial society of mass production to knowledge-based society of high-value products. Therefore high ranking universities in Korea should no longer be complacent about their superior status in the local community. They have to make efforts to compete with renowned higher education institutions overseas and transform in education and research. The Korean government has also pursued various policy measures to enhance the competitiveness of universities to the global level. Meanwhile, top universities around the world have achieved global competency through innovation in their education and research system. They have influence on changes in countries and companies as well. In this session, presidents of top universities will introduce their experiences of innovation in higher education, and discuss strategies to enhance the competitiveness of universities.

Special Session 3 & 4

A Dynamic Mapping of the UK's Creative Industries: The Convergence of Art & Science (Part I & II)

A decade ago the UK started to pay real attention to the creative industries as a serious part of the economy. Half of the employees in the creative industries have a university degree compared with 16% of the total national workforce. But John Newbigin argues that creative economy is much more than just creative industries and points to a report by the UK's National Endowment for Science and Technology and Arts(NESTA) 2008, Beyond the creative industries: Mapping the creative economy in the UK. This report concluded that more creative people actually work outside the creative industries in more conventional manufacturing and business in something called 'creative embedded employment'. This indicates that creativity sits not only at the heart of creative industries where you'd expect to see it but is a driver of the creative economy, more widely defined.

Creativity can be a destructive process, which brings innovation and change and the throwing out of the old. This session will look at UK universities as critical feeders for the creative industries and creative economy driving a process whereby disruption becomes the norm. All participating universities have driven themselves hard toward interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches across art, science and other disciplines to disrupt conventional patterns of thinking and bring innovation to society and the economy.

Plenary Session 4

The Secret of Vocational Education and Training in Germany, Switzerland & Singapore: How Did They Achieve World’s Lowest Youth Unemployment Rate?

European Bureau of Statistics announced the unemployment rate, 5.5%, and the youth unemployment rate, 7.7% in Germany (2013). The youth unemployment rate of Switzerland is even lower 6.0%. The figures are significantly lower compared with 7.6% and 16.2% in the U.S. last month, and 12.0% and 24% of the entire eurozone. The vocational education and training systems of Germany and Switzerland are the keys to maintain solid growth and a low unemployment rate of the German economy. The apprenticeship systems of the countries are well organized to develop skills with balanced combination of theoretical education and workplace-oriented practice. According to the estimates of the Cologne Institute of Management, Germany's vocational education system dropped the youth unemployment rate by an average of 5 percentage points. The vocational education and training systems of Germany and Switzerland are managed to provide the best talent to meet the demands of enterprises on the basis of theory and field experience accumulated. The most strong point of the system is that corporate can have fully-fledged skilled technicians. Furthermore, not only skills but also the loyalty to the employers is very high. In addition, the preferential climate for technicians and the socio-economic status for technical masters are as good as the highly educated. In this session, as a way to solve youth unemployment, we want to discuss the characteristics and strengths of vocational education and training in Germany and Switzerland, the current status of Singapore which introduced German’s system, and the implications.

Special Session 3 & 4

A Dynamic Mapping of the UK's Creative Industries: The Convergence of Art & Science (Part I & II)

A decade ago the UK started to pay real attention to the creative industries as a serious part of the economy. Half of the employees in the creative industries have a university degree compared with 16% of the total national workforce. But John Newbigin argues that creative economy is much more than just creative industries and points to a report by the UK's National Endowment for Science and Technology and Arts(NESTA) 2008, Beyond the creative industries: Mapping the creative economy in the UK. This report concluded that more creative people actually work outside the creative industries in more conventional manufacturing and business in something called 'creative embedded employment'. This indicates that creativity sits not only at the heart of creative industries where you'd expect to see it but is a driver of the creative economy, more widely defined.

Creativity can be a destructive process, which brings innovation and change and the throwing out of the old. This session will look at UK universities as critical feeders for the creative industries and creative economy driving a process whereby disruption becomes the norm. All participating universities have driven themselves hard toward interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches across art, science and other disciplines to disrupt conventional patterns of thinking and bring innovation to society and the economy.

TA-1

Skills Dynamics for Happy Education and Social Progress

The idea that skills play a central role for children's success has become the cornerstone of modern education policies and practices in OECD countries. However, ongoing assessments of schools and students tend to focus on cognitive ability, largely ignoring non-cognitive skills, such as perseverance, self-control and emotional stability. While cognitive skills are certainly important, emerging evidence suggests that non-cognitive skills are as important as cognitive skills in predicting many dimensions of children's life success and are malleable across the life cycle through interventions. Hence, it would be useful for education stakeholders to better understand which non-cognitive skills matter, how these skills interact with cognitive skills and develop via school and family inputs, and how skills affect children's life outcomes including healthy lifestyles, happiness, tertiary attainment, employment, and active citizenship. The ESP(Education and Social Progress) longitudinal study of skill dynamics led by OECD/CERI intends to analyze causal relationships among these variables and will provide an interesting discussion on how educators help children develop both cognitive and non-cognitive skills in balance, which is timely and relevant especially for Korean stakeholders who pursue 'Creative Economy' and 'Happy Education' as the core values of the current Park Geun-hye administration.

TB-1

How to Recruit & Train the Best Employees in the Job Market

Identifying and making use of human resources plays a decisive role in the success of a business. In the case of hiring upper level management, a hiring mistake can have devastating repercussions. As such, businesses are making significant efforts to increase their hiring expertise. In this session, speakers from successful companies will share their experiences and know-how on effectively recruiting, training, using and retaining human resources.

TC-1

Building Basics for Skill-oriented Society - National Competence Standards(NCS) & National Qualification Framework(NQF)

Park Geun-hye government as one of the major national issues presented 'implementation of non academic but skills-oriented society' and has been actively seeking to build systems of National Competence Standards(NCS) as a specific means. According to Article 2 of the Basic Law Qualifications, NCS is 'knowledge, skills, and information literacy required to perform the duties in industry which country organized by industry sector and level'. UK, Australia and many other OECD countries have been innovating vocational education and training system to meet industry demand on the axis of NCS. Korean electric terminal industries are already utilizing NCS in in-house training and personnel management. Ministry of Education and the ministry of Employment and Labor will build collaborative systems and complete to develop 68 NCS this year and the remaining 182 NCS next year. Once NCS system is established, vocational education and training which meets on-site demands will be achieved in education and training institutions. Because each standardized competency each job requires is proposed and related qualification system is established, workers' movement between works will be facilitated and workers will be able to acquire a higher level of competence and qualifications in a variety of ways. In general, NCS system building is achieved with the reorganization of National Qualification Framework (NQF). The standardization of skills needed in industry through NCS and the common recognition of education and training process through qualification system in the labor market could be able to draw workers' motivation. In this session, we would like to hear acumen and insight of domestic and foreign experts about how NCS and NQF, customized education and training are correlated and complementarily operated for them to be solutions for youth unemployment and the mismatch in the labor market. The vocational education and training systems of Germany and Switzerland are managed to provide the best talent to meet the demands of enterprises on the basis of theory and field experience accumulated. The most strong point of the system is that corporate can have fully-fledged skilled technicians. Furthermore, not only skills but also the loyalty to the employers is very high. In addition, the preferential climate for technicians and the socio-economic status for technical masters are as good as the highly educated. In this session, as a way to solve youth unemployment, we want to discuss the characteristics and strengths of vocational education and training in Germany and Switzerland, the current status of Singapore which introduced German’s system, and the implications.

TD-1

Developing Leaders of Character at West Point

The United States Military Academy at West Point, better known as West Point Academy, is a four-year coeducational federal service academy that has a large number of notable alumni such as President Dwight Eisenhower, General George Marshall and General Douglas McArthur. West Point has also produced eighteen NASA astronauts, including five who went to the Moon, and famous CEOs including Jim Kimsey (founder of AOL), Bob McDonald (P&G) and Alex Gorsky (Johnson & Johnson). West Point has been ranked as one of the best U.S. colleges in Forbes best college list. In this session, Brigadier General Timothy Trainor will share his experience as a dean of West Point and introduce the academy’s admission, curriculum, tradition, philosophy and vision, so we can understand how West Point maintains its history of excellence.

TA-2

Schools Nurturing Dreams and Aspirations

Educational reform movement to nurture creative talents equipped with competencies that the future society requires can be said to be the trend of the global education. This is because creativity and self directed learning capability of students are becoming more important as uncertainty about the future increases. To that end, we need to transform the conventional education system of rote learning into the education that develops students’ various skills and extends their creativity.

Against this backdrop, one of the most important roles of school education is nurturing creative talents by giving students an opportunity to explore their aptitude and future career while acquiring experiences and knowledge in various fields. To that end, we are introducing "Free semester system" to replace a regular semester for middle school to lay a foundation to transform overall primary and secondary education in Korea. We would also like to hold a profound discussion from a global perspective on how to implement "Free semester system".

TB-2

Breaking through the Wall of Conformity at Workplaces

Corporate organizations cannot depend entirely on the creativity and the energy of its leaders and employees. Especially in this economic downturn, companies are required to be more creative and flexible, yet maintaining its organizational stability and operational excellence. Though creative strategies are key factors to break through the economic crisis, each companies needs to maximize its existing operational excellence systems and cost-efficiency at the same time. In this session, speakers will discuss the ways to harmonize the variety and creativity within the group and learn from successful cases of ambidextrous organizations.

TC-2

Educational Welfare System for Multicultural Talents

Recently foreign workers and marriage immigrants have been increasing in numbers showing ethnic diversity in Korea. A bond of social consensus has been forming for need to resolve social conflict and develop social integration with multicultural families. While the percentage of school children from multicultural families has stably been increasing, the Korean government has to provide long term educational and welfare state level policies for them. In this session, we try to suggest the ways to reflect multicultural families' actual educational demands and support their best HRD and welfare.

TD-2

Gifted Youth Education: Now and the Future

Countries around the world are recognizing the importance of students with high aptitude and are developing gifted education programs. Israel offers selective programs to the top 3% of its students, and numerous states in the US provide systematic gifted education programs that receive the backing of state policy. Countries such as Singapore and China have long since run schools for gifted youth. In this era, Korea too needs youth that are familiar with literature, history and philosophy, while also having exposure to science, engineering and the arts. In this session, we will listen to the experiences of the heads of gifted learning programs from the US and Singapore, and see what lessons might be applicable to programs in Korea.

TA-3

Key Competencies for Future Leaders: Social Communication and Collaboration

As OECD's DeSeCo(Defining and Selecting Key Competencies) project shows, the world is shifting the focus of education from knowledge delivery to core skill building to prepare students for the future. Skills such as communication and collaboration are increasingly becoming more important in today's society where individuals change careers more often or experience earlier retirement. To be able to successfully re-plan one's career and life, one must be capable of communicating and working well with others. The session will discuss ways to effectively develop students' communication and collaboration skills, and instill job ethics through school education.

TB-3

Talented Young Entrepreneurs & Youth Start-ups in Creative Economy

One of the overwhelming trends of the 21st century, the age of the creative economy is the focusing on the market value of intellectual property characterized by the highlighting of human resources, who are very capable of being creative, innovative, as well as leading the world with the creative ideas. Research results that one patent causes maximum of five jobs (U.S.A. Berkeley Lab), and a 10% increase in the number of patents rises more than 1% higher economic growth (Korea Development Institute) support the heart of the creative economy that commercializes new technologies and services and activates youth venture to increase the economy.

And the Korean Intellectual Property Office(KIPO) and the Korea Invention Promotion Association(KIPA) coordinated The Future Creative Entrepreneur project in order to support selected middle and high school students who are talented and passionate in entrepreneurship. Two of the top universities (KAIST and POSTECH) in Korea have provided specialized educational programs for gifted young entrepreneurs in Korea. Also, to help those special youths in developing their potential and archiving their lifelong success as a gifted entrepreneur like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, the Educational Research Institute for the Gifted in Invention(formerly the Center for Gifted and Young Entrepreneurs) has provided individually customized services in various areas, including entrepreneurial giftedness, social and emotional needs, career guidance, and education.

This session will be focused on introducing the system of support for the development of human resources who are talented in intellectual property, considering the role of the youth ventures who have creative innovation and bouncing ideas with the programme engaged in the Future Creative Entrepreneur and will lead the youth venture in creative economy, and discussing about the more specialized support system and strategy through global cases to strengthen the capacity of entrepreneurship and start-up.

TC-3

Roles and Responsibility of Higher Vocational Education

Recently, "New Vocationalism", which refreshes how we look at vocational education, has been emerging largely in the U.S. and the U.K. Unlike its European neighbors, the U.K has developed vocational education system in a separate domain. In order to match vocational standard with educational standard, following skill changes of the 21 century, Europe linked the concept of learner-centered learning outcomes, proposed by professor S. Adams, to core concepts of NQF(national qualifications framework) and EQF(European qualifications framework) principles and has been applying it in the field. Therefore, looking into European education system, we can see various cases and implications of education aims at discovering learners’ competency and achieving the goal of competency based education.

In U.K., even a manual worker can seize an opportunity to become a successful regular employee or start a business when he or she passes a high level NVQ. The country has been able to reduce wage gap between regular and irregular workers since regular office workers can expect the comparable salaries with workers with higher education degrees. It adopted a learning module with an objective of improving flexibility in vocational education. Studying European best practices, we can benchmark European examples to ensure NCS and NQF take root in Korea. Moreover, by doing so, we can also get to see how they minimize government intervention, distribute responsibilities of individuals and the private sector to implement balanced competency-oriented social policies.

TD-3

Beyond the Classroom Walls to Communicate with the World

21st century learner skills such as creativity, communication, collaboration, character and citizenship among others are emphasized in this rapidly developing and changing information technology driven society. In order for our learners to cope up with this changing social demand, changes in educational paradigm, content, methodology and environment are strongly required.

This session will deal with the 21st century learner capacity based on the new educational methodology, which will lead to cultivating our learners into a valuable citizen of global community.

First, 21st century learner capacity and the examples of actual learning in class that incorporates the new trend will be discussed. Also, IVECA(Intercultural Virtual Exchange of Classroom Activities) case that goes beyond the physical limits of country and region with the help of ICT, Coursera and Khan Academy which are the online voluntary learning community are introduced.

Finally, we will discuss on the validity and direction of Smart Education in Korea whether the Smart Education can be applicable to bridge the educational disparities and to be an alternative to lifelong education as well.

TA-4

Lifelong Learning in the Centennial Era - For the Happy Third Age

The lifelong education system for rapidly aging population is one of the most important issues nowadays as it is turning into the era of centenarians. Lifelong education programs provide individuals with opportunities to further develop their potentials and skills in order to plan for the later lives after retirement. In a long run, well-designed lifelong education system will guide social integration and enhanced national competitiveness. The session will introduce some successful cases of other countries, draw new directions for lifelong education policies in our aging society, and explore the ways to improve the education programs to meet the needs of various age groups and social classes.

TB-4

How Global Companies Recruit C-level Executives

As company executives play an increasingly important role in value creation, businesses are focusing on ways to increase their competitiveness by hiring the best possible candidates, be it by scouting executives from other companies, or by training and promoting executives from within. In this session we will look at the career track to becoming an executive at a few companies with an eye towards the considerations that come into play and the qualities sought after in candidates when scouting or promoting from within, in other words we will look at the ins and outs of executive selection and training.

TC-4

Graduating in a Competitive Job Market: Which is the Most Required Skill or Quality?

The high unemployment rate of young adults (15-29 years old) in the world, compared to other age groups, is a reality. This happened in the aftermath of mismatch of jobs that require a lot of college graduates, and companies that need staffing of the labor market. The recent corporate form of employment has aggravated youth unemployment. While continuing global recession, companies prefer experienced employees more than new employees’ recruitment. This is why companies require immediate practical processing personnel. Newly recruited college graduates showed the ability to work at low level of 67 points out of 100 points (The Chamber of Commerce and Industry). While college graduates’ common job skills such as foreign languages and computer work are comparatively higher, their major knowledge and skills do not meet the expectations of the companies. As a result, companies are investing heavily in retraining for new recruited college graduates. Many professionals argue that college education should focus on the development of the ability to perform tasks that can compete with the staff in the school curriculum. In this session, we propose solutions for the promotion of college graduates’ employment competency through discussion of national and international experts about what job competencies are required by companies.

TD-4

How Social Media Changes HR

In recent, most of the large companies in the world actively use various social media channels such as Facebook, Twiter and blogs due to the significance of social media adoption and its effectiveness in corporate marketing and organizational management.

In this session, Mr. Madan Nagaldinne, Asia-Pacific Facebook's Head of HR, will speak about the impact of social media on HR and how it can facilitate a more dynamic and effective form of person-to-person connection at workplaces.

Wrap-up

Wrap-up

(1) Gender Wall
(2) Racial & Cultural Wall
(3) Generational Wall
(4) Regional Wall
(5) Wall Between Big and Small Enterprises
(6) Wall Between Academia and Industry
(7) Wall Between Elite and Mass Education
(8) Wall Between Liberal Arts & Natural Sciences
(9) Wall Between Academic Disciplines
(10) Wall of Institutional Selfishness